10 Smart Ways To Help CHWs Learn Better

Following the positive response we received from our article Ways to Increase E-learning Participation among health worker professional development programs, we offer 10 more ways to help learners lock away lessons.

1. Address common reasons learners don't retain information.

The most common reason why people don't retain learning is they don't finish a course. If you can find out what the underlying reasons are for dropping out, you can present your learners with an experience they can use. In most cases, withdrawals are due to family, job commitments (very common with CHWs who balance working in the field with completing a course), vacations and poor time management. Change up when and how you offer your information, and you can make it easier for students to complete.

The Beginner's Guide To Blending Live and Computer-Based Training

Your community health workers will thank you for discovering the best way of delivering educational materials.

Blended learning takes the best of in-person training and melds it with the best of online training. It’s a principle that predates e-learning, because teachers have been mixing facilitation methods for years as they mix different facilitation methods, resource formats, and technologies. What makes it relevant to the e-learning world is part of the teaching occurs with an Internet connection.

Here's a fairly typical format for a blended training program we see at CHWTraining:

Typical blended learning format

Why Use Blended Learning?

Blended learning is a flexible approach to addressing a range of learning styles and also adapting content to the right format. For example, motivational interviewing might be better addressed in a live setting, while assessment skills are easy to teach online. Studies have shown that it's easier to keep a group engaged for longer with a blended program.

A Guide To Online Learning Delivery

The term "online learning" is notoriously slippery. One person's PDF handout is another person's webinar.

While defining the way you deliver training online to community health workers might be confusing to the uninitiated, there is a method that the industry follows. Here's a handy little guide to how e-learning is delivered, which is summed up in two words: asynchronous and synchronous.

Asynchronous: Learning At Different Times

Asynchronous means that learners may be in the class together, but they're not online at the same time. One person might log in to review their work in the morning, while another logs in at midnight. They're reviewing the same information, they even might be completing assignments together, but they do their work at different times. The work gets done when the learner does it. There may or may not be a facilitator or instructor with asynchronous learning. Examples:

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