A Guide To Online Learning Delivery

The term "online learning" is notoriously slippery. One person's PDF handout is another person's webinar.

While defining the way you deliver training online to community health workers might be confusing to the uninitiated, there is a method that the industry follows. Here's a handy little guide to how e-learning is delivered, which is summed up in two words: asynchronous and synchronous.

Asynchronous: Learning At Different Times

Asynchronous means that learners may be in the class together, but they're not online at the same time. One person might log in to review their work in the morning, while another logs in at midnight. They're reviewing the same information, they even might be completing assignments together, but they do their work at different times. The work gets done when the learner does it. There may or may not be a facilitator or instructor with asynchronous learning. Examples:

Register for "What Every AHEC Needs To Know About Online Training"

When: Tues., Oct. 7, 2014, 1pm ET
Length: 60 minutes

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Everyone talks about online learning, but what does it really mean? We'll cut through the jargon to explain the basics of health-based e-learning, and discuss why offering online courses can help you boost your enrollment numbers. We'll identify the elements you'll need to structure your online training program.

In this webinar, you'll learn how to get the whole team on board, what the technology requirements are, and why your learners are probably asking for online module delivery. You'll walk away with knowledge about online training that will help energize your organization and help you increase participation in your program.

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5 Apps & Tech Tools to Try for Your Online Training Program

Dozens of new services and promise to bring strength to your online community health worker training program. Here are five that are honestly useful.

Unless you're considering setting up and hosting your own online learning program in-house (most organizations go with a managed hosting company like Talance unless they have a dedicated technical department with specialists), the list of technical tools you actually need to run your program is pretty short:

  • A computer
  • A mobile device for testing
  • Headphones, speakers or some way of listening to audio
  • A connection to the Internet

If you have CHWs in the field, that list might expand to include a terminal for checking lessons and possibly a printer.

Meanwhile, the list of software, apps and online services that promise a more productive and engaging online learning program continues to grow. Look at this enormous list of lists from Education World magazine, for starters.

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