10 skills CHWs can learn right now—without leaving the couch

Use at-home time to brush up on existing skills or pick up some new ones.

The now-global spread of coronavirus is affecting everyone. This disease has brought a host of medical, economic, and political problems. It’s brought all of us—CHWs, supervisors, program managers, clients, and patients alike–a ton of uncertainty and anxiety. This can have an enormous impact on everyone’s emotional and physical wellbeing.

Whenever you’re feeling unsure and anxious about the things you can’t control, it can be helpful to focus on the things you can control, such as your education. While you or your staff might be stuck at home or in a quiet facility, the Internet is still on. So rather than panic-scrolling through social media feeds about toilet paper, put that energy into picking up some new skills or improving the ones you already have.

[Related: The 27 New Skills You Can Now Learn on CHWTraining]

10 Skills CHWs Can Learn from Home

They say there is no such thing as useless knowledge. These 10 skills are definitely worth learning—and learning them can make time based at home time well spent. In the future, these skills form a great workforce development path and can make each CHW a better worker.

  1. Meditation and mindfulness techniques
  2. Depression, Anxiety and Stress
  3. COVID-19
  4. Smoking cessation
  5. Chronic illness
  6. Immunizations
  7. Motivational Interviewing interventions
  8. Healthy cooking
  9. Hand hygiene
  10. Language

1. Meditation and mindfulness techniques

Relaxation and mindfulness are skills that can help you in your personal and professional life—especially now when everything feels uncertain. Mindfulness practices can help people manage stress, deal with serious illness, and reduce anxiety and depression, according to the NIH. These are helpful skills to pass on to clients, employees, and the people around you.

“The most important thing to know when starting a meditation or mindfulness practice is that there is no right or wrong way to ‘do’ it,” says Laura Wells, a facilitator and coach who works with individuals, teams, and organizations to increase focus and build compassionate leadership.

“It is simply about learning to relax into the present moment — there’s nothing we have to, or can, ‘do’ to make the present moment happen. This is about allowing the space for a minute or two or five to not be in charge of what’s occurring. Simply breathing and bringing attention to what is already here in our experience.”

If you want to practice now, you can join Wells for a free 30-minute virtual meditation and connection session Tuesday, Mar 24, 2020, 12:10 PM Pacific Time. Click here to join and use meeting ID: 144 588 211.

2. Depression, Anxiety and Stress


Nearly everyone is feeling depression, anxiety, and stress right now, so it helps you and anyone you work with if you can pick up management skills. Start by recognizing the symptoms of depression from the National Institute of Mental Health.

Then what to do if you see them in yourself or in another. This guide will help you understand when it’s time to make a behavioral health referral.

Supervisors and program managers supporting a community health team with limited resources can easily feel overwhelmed. You have to think about self-care strategies to share, how to help them control stress, and spot signs of burnout and compassion fatigue.

Sign up for Supporting Mental Wellness in CHW Teams, a free on-demand session on improving your team’s mental wellness, identify signs that an employee is at risk for depression, anxiety, or secondary trauma, and show you how you can help your team improve their personal and professional lives.

3. COVID-19

If you’re looking to learn more about coronavirus, then the WHO is the place to start for any health professional. The OpenWHO Massive Online Open Courses for COVID-19 provide learning resources for health professionals, decision-makers, and the public. As the pandemic continues to evolve, new resources will be added, additional language versions will continue to be rolled out, and existing courses will be updated to best reflect the changing context. Some sample courses are “Operational Planning Guidelines to Support Country Preparedness and Response” and “Infection Prevention and Control.”

4. Smoking cessation and vaping


People with unhealthy lungs are particularly at risk for complications from coronavirus, and many other health issues. Learning about these risks can help you talk clearly to clients who smoke. There’s plenty of new information regarding severe lung disease associated with using vaping devices and e-cigarette products, so now is a time to learn about that, especially among youth.

“There are many websites, webinars and listserves available for folks to learn the latest on commercial tobacco and vaping,” Says Norilyn de la Peña, Cessation and Outreach Project Manager at Public Health — Seattle & King County. It’s important to seek resources that are credible. People want information on what vaping products are how to have effective conversations about their use. She suggests learning about these tobacco cessation and vaping education topics for all providers:

  • What the products are and how they are used
  • Why it’s important to keep flavored tobacco and nicotine from youth (affects on brain and lung development, increase chance of addiction, increase likelihood of tobacco use, etc.)
  • Media literacy and tobacco and vape marketing intentionally target low-income communities
  • The importance of sharing valid information from appropriate online resources
  • How to talk to young people about vaping
  • Alternatives to nicotine and tobacco use; positive stress management and coping skills
  • What resources are available

She recommends the following general resources:

  • Truth Initiative
  • AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics)
  • SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)
  • SCLC (Smoking Cessation Leadership Center)

Public Health — Seattle & King County’s website has Lung disease related to vaping and e-cigarette use. It has an excellent collection of materials, templates, and FAQs for providers, partners, and schools on understanding vaping and how it affects the lungs.

5. Chronic illness

CHWs are vital to successfully managing and avoiding chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, breast cancer, and cervical cancer. Since CHWs are health brokers who can connect providers with communities, take some time to learn more about the chronic diseases in your community and how CHWs can help.

If you’re a program manager or administrator new to CHWs, do some deep reading on building the policies and systems that support CHWs to see how they fit in with your organization. Start with the excellent document “Addressing Chronic Disease Through Community Health Workers: A Policy and Systems-Level Approach,” (PDF) from the CDC. Then take some time to watch Examining Community Health Worker Models in Managing Chronic Conditions.

If you’re a CHW, you can learn how chronic illness and mental health are closely linked. This video Ask an Expert – Depression and Chronic Illness Webinar (1:19) explores the relationship between depression and Nephrotic Syndrome, specifically, but the topic relates to people living with many chronic diseases.

CHWs can also save on CHWTraining’s chronic illness bundle. It helps you master working with clients with breast cancer (Breast Cancer Screening), cervical cancer (Cervical Cancer Screening and HPV), Diabetes and Prediabetes, and High Blood Pressure (Hypertension). Along the way, you’ll learn how to screen for disease, talk to clients, and connect to resources in your agency and community.

6. Immunizations


Parents and individuals are too reluctant to get vaccines, thanks in part to too much mistaken information. Patient education is an important way to let people know that vaccinations have an excellent safety record and are an important part of preventing serious diseases. A simple flu shot, covered by many health plans, is the best way for people to protect themselves and their children from getting the influenza.

The AAP is an excellent resource for educating parents and any individual on immunizations. It includes the recommended immunization schedule, information for parents, and communication tips for the conversations you’ll have with parents.

7. Motivational Interviewing interventions

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a technique you can use to help people discover their own reasons for positive change in a non-confrontational way. It was originally developed as a way to help people quit smoking, but MI techniques can be used for helping people make any kind of behavioral change.

Demonstration and practice are the best ways to learn and improve your MI skills, so spend some time reviewing some sample intervention videos, such as these:

8. Healthy cooking


Nutrition and health are closely related, from a healthy diet helping children grow up to avoid chronic diseases to managing—and maybe even reversing—conditions like diabetes. Learning healthy cooking is an excellent skill you can pass on to your clients, and your own family.

Try My Doctor – Kaiser Permanente, which has many how-to videos, ranging from short-and-sweet lessons like Add Flavor Without Salt (2:33) for hypertension, to Tips for Cooking Healthier (2:01), to in-depth webinars like Fresh Food Ideas (1:01:00) for parents.

9. Hygiene

Time to get serious about hand hygiene. Learn, demonstrate, repeat.

10. Language

Communication is a key skill for CHWs, and being able to speak and understand more than English helps. Learning a foreign language, such as Spanish for English-speakers or English for Spanish-speakers, is a great way to unlock better employment options and connect clients to resources.

Smart phone apps like Duolingo are great vocabulary builders, and you can do them whenever you have a few free minutes. Another fun one is Lirica, which matches language with pop music. It takes the music from such musicians as Enrique Iglesias and turns it into Spanish vocabulary and grammar lessons.

Keep building skills

Just reading a PDF or a PowerPoint presentation isn’t enough to really learn. Practice your skills as soon as you can. Keep refreshing your skills once you’ve learned something. Bookmark this page so you can keep revisiting these resources and keep them fresh.

CHWs Can Improve Oral Health Disparities

People who work with people’s teeth understand what kind of view that provides to the whole body. They see first hand how the mouth can reflect problems around the body and how problems with the mouth can affect the rest of the body. Poor dental health can correlate to chronic conditions ranging from heart disease to diabetes to brain degeneration—and more.

Almost all Americans understand this first-hand. Over 90% have at least one tooth that’s been treated for decay or needs to be. About a quarter of U.S. adults between 20 and 64 need a filling. Cavities are the most common chronic childhood infectious disease. Periodontal disease is also tragically undertreated in the States and affects about half of us. The problem there is that people with gum disease are 2 to 3 times more likely to have cardiovascular problems.

Oral Health Disparities

Access to health care and proper education helps address this gap, but there are stark disparities in the oral health of men, women, and children. These oral health disparities can have serious consequences, which we explore in depth in the CHWTraining course Oral Health Disparities.

Learn more about how CHWTraining Subscriptions can help increase CHW/promotora satisfaction, retention, and improve oral health outcomes

Some of the statistics from our course are unsettling.

“Blacks, non-Hispanics, and Mexican Americans aged 35–44 years experience untreated tooth decay nearly twice as much as white, non-Hispanics,” according to the CDC. Latino children have higher rates of tooth decay, rampant decay, and treatment need, compared to non-Latino white children.

Image: Pew Charitable Trusts

Education is widely lacking. I, for one, have never once in my life been told that women have unique oral health concerns, despite regular checkups and experience with recurring canker sores and inflamed gums. Are most pregnant women told they are far more likely to have gum disease or loose teeth or that morning sickness is a problem for teeth? I’m guessing not.

The trouble is that too few of the people in charge see it that way. Starting from the top with health policy all the way down to children who haven’t learned to brush regularly, too many people are tuned out to the connection between oral and overall health.

Many people can’t afford dental insurance or expensive electronic toothbrushes or a house where the water is fluoridated, especially in underserved rural and urban areas. Still, there isn’t much care coordination and patient navigation to support people.

Fortunately, this trend is reversable because relatively simple prevention goes a long way with oral and overall health.

CHWs Can Reverse Oral Health Disparities

Communities and health systems need to step up oral health by providing better access to dentists and education. Community health workers (CHWs), promotores de salud, and other lay educators are in a perfect position to help.

States and health systems should work to include oral health education as a part of CHW training. They can help people navigate such barriers as poverty, language, geography, and even transportation. And they can do it where people live, not necessarily in a clinical setting. This is a relatively low-cost way to engage families but can have a tremendous impact a person’s health, from childhood through the rest of their life.

Interested in educating your team in oral health disparities? Contact us to learn how.

 

What’s New for Navigating Health Insurance

Almost 10 years after the Affordable Care Act passed—and six years after CHWTraining released the Navigating Health Insurance course–more Americans are insured. However, more people are under-insured. Plus, government funded education about the ACA has been either reduced or eliminated, which leaves many more people confused about coverage.

Adults in the U.S. still need support, especially now when health insurance shoppers in many states must buy coverage that will begin in 2020. Some states, such as California, set a heavy tax penalty for those who don’t have health insurance at all. Without the proper education about health insurance, patient populations will only decline if trends in insurance cover continue on the path they’re on.

CHWs and Health Insurance

Community health workers are more important than ever in helping people become insured and also understand the basics of health insurance. CHWs can connect clients to professionals who can help them sign up for insurance, make payments and file claims.

That’s why we created Navigating Health Insurance and included it as part of our core competencies for CHWs learning track. As part of our latest updates to the course, we took a careful look at how things have changed in the last six years. The data reveals that confusion about health coverage in the U.S. has significant consequences for people’s overall health and well-being.

[Add Navigating Health Insurance to any Learning Track.]

Trends in Navigating Health Insurance

According to the Commonwealth Fund, which conducts surveys of health insurance, today compared to 2010:

  • More people have insurance
  • More people are underinsured
  • People who are underinsured or uninsured have trouble getting care because of cost and paying medical bills

Here are some important highlights about health insurance we learned during our recent updates:

Low Health Insurance Literacy Stops People from Seeking Care

People who don’t understand how health insurance works are more likely to avoid care. People will skip treatment due to cost. This is a powerful case for health insurance literacy as well as general health literacy.

Noncitizens Are More Likely Than Citizens To Be Uninsured

Nearly a quarter of lawfully present immigrants and more than four in ten (45%) undocumented immigrants are uninsured compared to less than one in ten (8%) citizens.

Uninsured Rates among Nonelderly Adults by Immigration Status, 2017

The U.S. Spends More on Health Than Anywhere Else

On average, the U.S. spends twice as much as other wealthy countries per person on health., according to a KFF analysis of OECD and National Health Expenditure (NHE).

The U.S. Spends More on Health Than Anywhere Else

On average, the U.S. spends twice as much as other wealthy countries per person on health., according to a KFF analysis of OECD and National Health Expenditure (NHE).

Health consumption expenditures per capita

Many People Think They Don’t Need Travel Health Insurance

Serious problems when traveling in other countries are rare, many people do get hurt. People with chronic illnesses can also be at risk of a medical emergency. This decision can be an expensive mistake if they become sick or hurt while in other countries, and their main insurance doesn’t work. Request a copy of the Travel Health Insurance Toolkit to use with clients.

Millions of People are Uninsured and Even More Are Underinsured

Around 25 million people don’t have health insurance at all, and for those who do, premiums on family policies have increased 54% in the last decade.

Number of Uninsured and Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population

Not understanding health insurance is bad for people in the U.S. Government debates about ACA and Medicaid aren’t helping people know how their health is affected by coverage. Community health workers are more important than ever when it comes to navigating health insurance.

If you’re not including training about navigating health insurance in your CHW workforce, start now. If you’re interested in building a diabetes education program for your team with these or other courses, contact us to learn how to add certified training to your program. Our team will be in touch ASAP to schedule a time to chat.

Build Skills in These 3 Areas To Stop Diabetes Killing People

Many programs dedicated to controlling and reversing diabetes in the 1 out of 3 Americans who have it also know that making lifestyle changes is critical.

Studies show people can stop problems from diabetes before they start if they exercise regularly, eat a balanced diet with plenty of produce, and avoid smoking and heavy drinking. Many people with prediabetes don’t even know they have it, so education around the topic is essential.

Providing this kind of diabetes education and motivating people to make lifestyle changes are exactly where community health workers (CHWs) excel. Health initiatives targeted at reducing incidence of diabetes are creating more CHW jobs, because it’s proven that CHWs help patients manage diabetes.

That’s why many programs already know they should provide introductory training in diabetes education that covers what the disease is and how it affects people. But they stop short. Because so many factors feed into developing diabetes that it’s important to create a multi-dimensional training plan to have a truly effective CHW team.

Knowing which skills are necessary for diabetes interventions is the first step. Then, organizations can set up a training plan to best position CHWs for helping people to make changes.

The following three areas are a must for any diabetes education program:

[Add Diabetes and Prediabetes to any subscription—read more]

1. Tobacco cessation

CHWs need skills in tobacco cessation—including Motivational Interviewing—to address many health problems caused by smoking and using tobacco. Tobacco cessation skills are also critical for diabetes prevention and control programs.

Smokers are more at risk for developing type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers, and that risk goes up along with the number of cigarettes smoked. Smoking damages cells in the body by increasing inflammation and mixing chemicals in cigarettes with oxygen, called oxidative stress. Smoking can also lead to more belly fat, itself linked with diabetes.

Smokers who already have type 2 diabetes have more serious health problems. Nicotine can make insulin less effective. They’re also more likely to have heart and kidney disease, poor circulation in the legs and feet, and blindness.

2. Physical activity

Americans sit too much and exercise too little, so CHWs who know how to get people up and moving are helping prevent a host of health problems in addition to diabetes. According to studies, moving around shows immediate health benefits, including reducing anxiety, improving blood pressure and insulin sensitivity.

Read more: Your Community Is Still Sitting Too Much [New Guidelines]

Physical activity fights diabetes on several fronts. It makes a body more sensitive to insulin and helps people lose weight and maintain a healthy weight. It also helps control blood sugar levels.

CHWs who are trained in physical activity and active living are in a better position to make recommendations to people, no matter what their barriers are (physical, geographical, financial, etc.). They can also help patients and clients set and stick to goals and maintain an activity program that works.

3. Healthy eating

Finding a healthy eating strategy is probably at the top of a diabetes prevention and control program, and it may be one of the toughest strategies for people to follow. Following a diabetes diet means eating a plant-heavy diet that’s rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. People should add more fruits, vegetables and whole grains to their plates. That helps with weight loss and also controlling blood glucose.

Many people with diabetes work with a dietitian to develop a healthy eating plan, but CHWs can work with them to make food choices that work for each person’s preference, location and culture.

Training in healthy eating can also be matched with training in physical activity to offer more comprehensive support to clients.

Suggested training curriculum

A comprehensive CHWtraining curriculum for a team of CHWs looking to control diabetes should start here:

  • Diabetes and Prediabetes
  • Supporting Tobacco Cessation
  • Promoting Healthy Lifestyles
  • Motivational Interviewing: Peer Support for Behavior Change

A useful expansion pack of diabetes education resources includes options for supporting clients on their journey:

  • Providing Social Support
  • Health Literacy: A Start
  • Substance Use

During National Diabetes Month, you can add Diabetes and Prediabetes to any subscription on CHWTraining. If you’re interested in building a diabetes education program for your team with these or other courses, click the button below to learn how to add certified training to your program. Our team will be in touch ASAP to schedule a time to chat.

Most Important Job Skills To Build a CHW Career Path

Employment for community health workers is looking up. More organizations are looking for ways to include CHWs and provide more CHW core competency training for internal staff. This is good news for anyone looking to put themselves on a CHW career path while improving health outcomes for their community.

Careful planning of a CHW career path can allow anyone who starts with an entry-level job to expand it into a rewarding career. As need for this role keeps growing, CHWs can not only increase the health knowledge of their community members but also increase their own reach to more people and other job opportunities.

CHW Job Outlook

The statistics are inspiring. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, jobs for CHWs are expected to rise 18.1% by 2026. That means that an estimated 10,400 jobs should open up. Also, salaries for already employed CHWs are increasing. Wages are good, with a median of $19.01 per hour, or $39,540 annually.

Acquiring the skills to become a CHW can open the door to a profitable and secure career.

Building a CHW career path–rather than just finding an entry-level job—involves understanding the core competencies and what kinds of skills are useful for ongoing growth.

In order to earn a profitable job and build a lasting career, current and prospective CHWs need to keep their health and professional skills sharp. They need to take extra training and prove their knowledge and expertise through certification. A CHWTraining learning subscription offers complete, up-to-date training for employers who want to provide staff with foundational skills and knowledge of specific health topics, such as diabetes or breast cancer.

We created the quick guide below as a tool for employers who want to build sustainable training programs and CHWs who want to understand the job qualifications.

CHW Core Competencies

CHWs are employed in every state of the US (except South Dakota, for which no data is available), according to the BLS. Each state has independent job requirements, which vary from college degrees that take multiple years to complete to on-the-job training. Some states require certification, and some employers require certificates of completion to show successful training.

CHW jobs by state

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

However, there are some similarities among all the differences related to core competencies, which are available through CHWTraining’s Learning Tracks. The following are common skills required by many programs and advisory committees. Here are some CHW core competency training areas common among the Washington State Department of Health’s CHW program, the Roles and Competencies from the Community Health Worker Core Consensus (C3) Project, the US Department of Labor Employment & Training Administration, and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. You can compare more national requirements at State Community Health Worker Models from the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP).

CHW Training Guide

Core CompetencyExample Skills
Advocacy Skills/Capacity Building SkillsEmpower clients, motivate people to manage their own health and advocate for themselves, help people reach their goals, support behavior change, identify and overcome barriers, understand community cultures and ways to reach members.
Care Coordination or Service Coordination and System NavigationNavigate systems and collaborate with partners to connect clients to resources; help service providers work together; tell systems about needs of people; help develop and implement care plans.
Communication SkillsListening skills, language skills, building rapport, using nonverbal communication, resolving and avoiding conflict, understanding and working within culturally diverse communities.
Cultural Humility/Cultural ResponsivenessServe as a bridge between different cultures, translate healthy behaviors into culturally appropriate equivalents, understand and work to reduce health disparities, use cultural sensitivities for all diverse groups, behave respectfully, identify bias.
Education and Facilitation SkillsUse various ways to deliver health information clearly, explain terms in plain language, promote healthy behavior change, find and use resources to develop self-efficacy skills.
Evaluation and ResearchIdentify issues in communities and their causes, conduct evaluation projects, collect data, share results, communicate to stakeholders to make changes in services.
Experience and Knowledge BaseFully understand the community, including social determinants of health, health issues, ways to improve health and self-care, and basic public-health principles; understand how US social-service systems work.
Individual and Community Assessment and Direct ServicesIdentify needs, strengths and resources of communities; help meet needs; help clients understand their needs and overcome barriers; provide social and health support.
Interpersonal and Relationship-Building SkillsEstablishing trust with people and in communities, being open-minded, using Motivational Interviewing techniques.
Outreach Skills, Methods and StrategiesDevelop and implement outreach plans, share information about programs and resources, create and maintain relationships with community members and partners.
Professional Skills and ConductUnderstand and handle legal and ethical challenges, respect confidentiality and privacy rights, respond appropriately in complex situations, understand and follow agency rules.

 

7 Outreach Resources for National Latinx AIDS Awareness Day.

[Lee este artículo en español aquí.]

HIV used to be a death sentence—and for many, it still is. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that race and ethnicity have an effect on prevention and management of HIV/AIDS. Over the years, outreach campaigns have been essential to reducing such barriers as stigma and supporting the men and women who are at risk of HIV/AIDS or who are living with it.

The National Latino AIDS Awareness Day (NLAAD) on October 15 is a way to raise awareness of HIV in Latinx communities, including testing, prevention, and education. Stigma is a difficult barrier, which is part of what’s fueling NLAAD.

CHWTraining has educated people across the country and distributed resources to help health workers run successful awareness and outreach campaigns since developing HIV/AIDS: Supporting Community Members. Here are 7 free outreach tools and resources (in English and Spanish) that will help you and your team support National Latino AIDS Awareness Day on October 15 and all year around.

[This month, you can add HIV/AIDS: Supporting Community Members in English or Spanish to any learning subscription at no extra cost. Contact CHWTraining to get started.]

1. Expanding Your Reach To End the HIV Epidemic: Community Engagement Toolkit (PDF), Minority AIDS Council

Language: English

This in-depth toolkit is a step-by-step process for building and launching a community engagement program for reducing HIV in communities. This toolkit is for program coordinators or administrators rather than CHWs working alone, but it’s still a great educational tool loaded with ideas and examples. Anyone can review “Principles for Community Engagement” or templates for surveys and assessments. Many examples of projects targeting Latino communities.

2. Blueprint For Improving Hiv/Std Prevention And Care Outcomes For Black And Latino Gay Men, NASTAD (National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors)

Language: English

This downloadable toolkit zeroes in on one of the toughest areas of HIV prevention there is, especially in the Latino community: stigma. Stigma is an especially dangerous barrier because it stops people from taking action to protect themselves, get tested or get treated. The document helpfully talks about stigma and includes reflective questions that help guide administrators through setting up an HIV and STD outreach program to target the area. The “Recommended Steps for Removing Stigma from Public Health Practice” is a helpful guide to drive a campaign and offer services.

3. We Are Family or Somos Familia, Greater Than AIDS

Language: English and Spanish

Greater Than AIDS offers several documentaries in both English and Spanish that address relationships for Latinos living with HIV. Share these videos with clients and partners to show how important social support is for people with HIV. Strong support networks make it more likely that people will seek care and stick to treatment programs. Greater Than also offers community toolkits for on-the-ground outreach.

4. You Know Different Social Marketing Campaign Toolkit (PDF), The National Youth Advocacy Coalition

Language: English

This toolkit is made especially for anyone looking to use social marketing as an outreach strategy to encourage youth HIV testing. It is intended to help organizations plan and carry out the You Know Different social marketing campaign. That aims to boost counseling, testing, and referral services among and sexual minority youth of color aged 13–24. It’s incredibly detailed and useful with key messages that are useful in any campaign.

5. Detengamos Juntos el VIH, CDC

Language: Spanish

This web-based guide provides case studies with sample scripts to deal with the stigma around HIV and Latinos. It’s part of a larger campaign to address HIV. This short section is immediately useful for anyone who engages with clients in various situations.

6. Campanas para la movilizacion social (PDF), Ingeniería sin Fronteras Asociación para el Desarrollo

Language: Spanish

This Spanish social mobilization tool is made as a how-to guide for outreach in various sectors. It carefully plots out each step to creating and executing any outreach campaign, including several examples for HIV/AIDS campaigns. At 200 pages, it’s a weighty resource, but it’s a useful tool for engaging Spanish-speaking audiences.

7. Latinx People, The Body

Language: English

The Body is an outstanding resource for HIV/AIDS education. This collection of stories, news and reports on Latino populations dealing with HIV is inspirational and useful. For example, a story on HIV in Orange County, California, provides a snapshot about the LGBTQ-focused preventive and primary care organization and how they’re fighting diseases such as HIV/AIDS. Another story “Fighting a Rising HIV Epidemic Among Latino Gay and Bisexual Men in Phoenix” is loaded with personal stories.

7 Recursos de Proyección Comunitaria para el Día de Concientización Latinx sobre el SIDA

[Read this post in English.]

El contagio por VIH solía ser una sentencia de muerte, y para muchos aún lo es. El Centro para el Control y prevención de Enfermedades Infecciosas (CDC) reporta que la raza y etnicidad tienen repercusiones sobre la prevención y manejo del VIH/SIDA.

El Día Nacional Latino para la Concientización del Sida (NLAAD), celebrado cada 15 de octubre, es una manera de despertar conciencia sobre el VIH en comunidades latinxs, incluyendo información sobre pruebas, prevención y educación al respecto.

Desde el desarrollo de Sida/VIH: Apoyando a los Miembros de la Comunidad, Talance ha educado a personas de todo el país y distribuido recursos para ayudar a que los trabajadores de salud comunitarios puedan llevar a cabo campañas de información y concientización exitosas. Contáctanos para saber más de nuestros servicios.

Para apoyar el Día Nacional Latino para la Concientización del Sida, aquí les mostramos 7 recursos (En inglés y en español) que le ayudarán a usted y su equipo a manejar la enfermedad en su comunidad.

1. Expandiendo tu alcance para terminar la epidemia de VIH: Kit de Herramientas para Involucrar a la Comunidad (PDF), Minority AIDS Council

Expandiendo tu alcance para terminar la epidemia de VIH: Kit de Herramientas para Involucrar a la Comunidad

Idioma: Inglés

Este completo juego de herramientas constituye un proceso paso a paso para elaborar y llevar a cabo un programa de integración comunitaria para reducir el VIH en una población. Está dirigido a coordinadores y administradores de los programas más que para los trabajadores comunitarios en sí, pero es una excelente herramienta educacional llena de ideas y ejemplos. Todos pueden aprender de “Principios para la Integración de la Comunidad” o los modelos para encuestas y listas de cotejo. También incluye muchos proyectos de ejemplo que tienen como objetivo comunidades latinas.

2. Plan de Acción para mejorar los resultados de la Prevención y Cuidado del VIH/ETS para Hombres Gay Latinos y Afroamericanos NASTAD (National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors)

Plan de Acción para mejorar los resultados de la Prevención y Cuidado del VIH/ETS para Hombres Gay Latinos y Afroamericanos

Idioma: Inglés

Este kit descargable se enfoca en uno de los puntos más difíciles para la prevención del VIH, especialmente en las comunidades latinas: El estigma. Esta es una barrera especialmente peligrosa, ya que hace que las personas no tomen ninguna acción para protegerse, hacerse exámenes de despistaje, o recibir tratamiento. Este documento ofrece información sobre el estigma e incluye preguntas y reflexiones que ayudarán a guiar a los administradores hacia la elaboración de programas de prevención contra el VIH y otras ETS para un área. Los “Pasos Recomendados para Eliminar el Estigma en las Prácticas de Salud Pública” es una excelente guía para impulsar una campaña y ofrecer servicios.

3. We Are Family o Somos Familia

We Are Family o Somos Familia

Idioma: Inglés y español

El sitio Greater than AIDS ofrece varios documentales, tanto en inglés como español, que hablan de las relaciones de los latinos que viven con VIH. Estos videos, que son sencillos de compartir con clientes y colegas, demuestran lo importante que es el apoyo social para las personas con VIH. Una red de apoyo fortalecida hace más probable que las personas busquen y sigan los programas de tratamiento. Greater than AIDS también ofrece herramientas comunitarias para campañas en la misma localidad.

4. Kit de Herramientas Para Marketing Social Tú Sabes Más (PDF), The National Youth Advocacy Coalition
Kit de Herramientas Para Marketing Social Tú Sabes Más

Idioma: Inglés

Este juego de herramientas está dirigido especialmente a quienes busquen usar las redes sociales como estrategia de acción para motivar a los jóvenes a hacerse pruebas de despistaje de VIH. La intención es ayudar a planificar y llevar a cabo la campaña de marketing social Tú Sabes Más, que busca fomentar la búsqueda de consejos, atención, pruebas y servicios referidos entre jóvenes de color y minorías sexuales de edades entre 13 y 24. Tiene mensajes útiles y detallados que pueden ser usados en cualquier campaña.

5. Detengamos Juntos el VIH, CDC

Detengamos Juntos el VIH

Idioma: Español

Esta guía web ofrece estudios de casos con libretos detallados acerca de cómo lidiar con el estigma alrededor del VIH en latinos. Es parte de una campaña más grande dirigida al VIH, la cual también resulta de gran ayuda, pero esta sección es de ayuda inmediata para quienes deben abordar a sus clientes de cualquier forma.

6. Campaña para la Movilización Social (PDF), Ingeniería sin Fronteras Asociación para el Desarrollo

Campaña para la Movilización Social

Idioma: Español

Esta herramienta de movilización social está escrita como una guía para hacer acercamientos en distintas comunidades. Da instrucciones detalladas paso a paso para la creación y ejecución de campañas comunitarias y también incluye ejemplos de campañas para el VIH/SIDA. Con más de 200 páginas es un recurso de peso, pero resulta una herramienta sumamente útil para alcanzar comunidades de habla hispana.

7. Gente Latinx, The Body

Gente Latinx

Idioma: Inglés

The Body es un extraordinario recurso para la educación acerca del VIH/SIDA. Esta colección de historias, noticias y reportes acerca de las poblaciones latinas que enfrentan el VIH es inspiradora y útil. Por ejemplo, la historia del VIH en Orange County, California, ofrece una visión sobre la prevención y el cuidado primario enfocado en poblaciones LGBTQ. Otra historia, “Luchando contra el surgimiento de la epidemia de VIH entre hombres latinos y bisexuales en Phoenix”, está cargada de anécdotas personales.

The ultimate list of CHW Conferences

I’m often asked, “Do you know of any upcoming conferences for CHWs in my area?” The answer used to be different, but these days, community health workers and others in a similar role are well represented at conferences. Here’s a list, so you can get planning. Know of others that aren’t here? Let me know!

Unity Conference

“Unity 2019 is a national conference designed for and about community health workers, community health representatives, and promotores.”  I’ll be presenting Mental Illnesses Are Epidemic: Helping Clients CopeSupervisor Support Skills for CHWs with Depression, Anxiety, and Secondary Trauma; and Burnout Prevention and Recovery for Community Health Workers. Unity 2019 will be held at the Las Vegas Flamingo Hotel and Casino on April 14-17, 2019, in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Community Health Worker Conference

“A conference that will explore why a racial justice approach is integral to strengthening the CHW workforce.”Presented by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers.May 16, 2019, Four Points Sheraton, Norwood

Hawai‘i Community Health Worker Leadership Conference

“Join us and your fellow CHWs and allies from across the state for a day of learning, sharing and networking. Be a part of the discussion on creating a Hawai’i-based CHW association.”Friday, June 28, 2019, from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM at the Ala Moana Hotel.

2019 Community Health Worker Conference: You are EPIC—Equitable, Passionate, Invested, and Collaborative

“The fifth annual Washington State Community Health Worker Conference is a two-day event that will engage, energize, and inspire CHWs and their allies to best support their communities.”April 11-12, 2019, Wenatchee Convention Center

Spectrum Health- Eleventh Annual Community Health Worker Conference

“Community Health Workers Leading Change at the Forefront of the Community: Being the Change You Want to See.  Conference Objectives; Discuss the effects of social injustice in our clients and communities, Creating educational opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of the Community Health Worker (CHW) in their roles in the community, Develop techniques to assist Community Health Workers in motivating their clients to make positive life changes.”Aug. 23, 2018 Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan

2019 MNCHWA Statewide Conference

“The Annual Minnesota Community Health Worker Alliance Statewide Conference brings together community health workers, supervisors, educators, providers, payers, policy makers and many others from across the state for a day of learning, exchange, networking and charting action on next-stage work.”May 2, 2019 | 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chanhassen, MN

Oregon Community Health Workers Association Annual Conference – You  Are The Voice Of The Community – Use It!

“The annual conference is ORCHWA’s signature event, bringing together Community Health Workers (CHW), Peer Support Specialists (PSS), Personal Health Navigators (PHN), Peer Wellness Specialists (PWS), doulas, other Traditional Health Workers, and supervisory staff.  This event addresses relevant policy and sustainability issues including: training, certification, employment opportunities, and more.”August 16 & 17, 2019, Inn at the Commons, Medford, Oregon

Visión y Compromiso’s 17th Annual Conference “United We Rise for a Healthy Community!”

“The goal of the conference is to create a space where experiences and ideas can be exchanged among promotores and other participants that foster the learning of new skills, knowledge and advocacy for our communities. The annual conference for promotores and community health workers is organized by Visión y Compromiso in collaboration with a planning committee that is comprised of promotores and other leaders in the community and organizations.”Sept. 26-28, 2019, Sheraton Gateway Los Angeles

42ndAnnual Rural Health Conference

“NRHA’s Annual Rural Health Conference is the nation’s largest rural health conference, created for anyone with an interest in rural health care, including rural health practitioners, hospital administrators, clinic directors and lay health workers, social workers, state and federal health employees, academics, community members and more.”May 7-10, 2019  Atlanta, Ga.

13th Annual CHW Conference – Houston, TX

“Who Should Attend: Community Health Workers / Promotores de Salud; CHW Instructors; Prospective CHW Employers; Community-based organization representatives.  CEUs: Combination of DSHS-certified and non-certified CHW and CHW-I CEUs.”Friday, May 10, 2019 from 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM (CDT)Houston, TX

2019 Community Health Institute & EXPO

“The NACHC Com­mu­nity Health Institute (CHI) and EXPO is the largest annual gathering of health center clinicians, executives, consumer board members, along with State/Regional Primary Care Associations and Health Center Controlled Networks.”Hyatt Regency Chicago, Chicago, IL, August 18-20, 2019

Indiana CHW/CRS Annual Conference

“The Indiana CHW/CRS Annual Conference is an opportunity for Community Health Workers and Certified Recovery Specialists to connect and network with other helping professionals and learn knowledge and skills beneficial to the important work that they do.”March 15, 2019, Hilton Garden Inn Indianapolis Airport

2019 National Conference,One Voice

“The ACHI National Conference, held each year in March, convenes 700 population and community health professionals to learn from experts and exchange the latest tools, approaches and ideas from the field.”March 19-21, 2019, Chicago

4th Annual Kentucky Community Health Worker Conference – Share Your Voice – Share Your Story

“Advocating and promoting the profession of Community Health Workers (CHWs) in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.”September 19, 2019, Embassy Suites, Lexington, Kentucky

The Academy of Oncology Nurse & Patient Navigators (AONN+)

“AONN+ will continue to advance the navigation profession by expanding the scope of educational sessions, networking opportunities, and industry-sponsored sessions through this conference. In addition, the Midyear Conference will address the evolving challenges of program improvement, the role of personalized medicine, and implementing best practices in navigation, survivorship, and psychosocial care.”San Diego, California May 16-19, 2019.

Read more about what we presented at the Unity Conference in our Resources

Is it time to make a Behavioral Health Referral?

In my session at the Unity 2019 Conference “Mental Illnesses Are Epidemic: Helping Clients Cope,” which I co-presented with Dr. Jeanine Joy from Happiness 1st, one of the hot questions for CHWs was: when is it time to make a referral?

It’s a great question, especially now at the beginning of Mental Health Month.

Even though community health workers can’t diagnose or directly treat a mental illness, there’s still a lot they can do. Making a referral for a mental illness like depression is an important step. Depression is like any chronic disease, which can be managed or avoided with early intervention.

This infographic is a short list of warning signs that should tip off a CHW that someone they’re working with might need a referral. Save and share with your CHW team.

Does your team need training in behavioral health? Read about our Healthy Living learning track.

Community Health Worker Models from Different States

Here is a link to find out what each state has in place for every Community Health Worker. You’ll find helpful information about CHW financing, education, certification, State CHW Legislation, and Organizations & Workgroup. You will also find every state’s information about CHW specific and defined roles.

We hope you’ll find this useful.